New Executive Director Appointed for the Ann Romney Center for Neurologic Diseases and the Program for Interdisciplinary Neuroscience at Brigham and Women’s Hospital

Charles G. Jennings, PhD, has been appointed the executive director of the Ann Romney Center for Neurologic Diseases and the Program for Interdisciplinary Neuroscience at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH).

  • Ann Romney Center for Neurologic Diseases: Researchers within the Romney Center are working to accelerate the development of new treatments, prevention, and cures for five complex neurologic diseases: multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease, ALS, Parkinson’s disease, and brain tumors.
  • Program for Interdisciplinary Science: The program draws together physicians, scientists and experts from across BWH who focus on disorders of the brain and nervous system, including neurology, psychiatry, neurosurgery, and other clinical disciplines. Its first projects include the a Neurotechnology Studio, a suite of advanced instruments for neuroscience research; the Women’s Brain Initiative; and a traveling fellowship program for young researchers.

Martin A. Samuels, MD, director of the Program for Interdisciplinary Neuroscience and chair of the Department of Neurology at BWH notes. “Dr. Jennings’ range of experience and knowledge — in neurobiology, directing research organizations, and as a leader in medical publishing — is a perfect fit for our needs, as we continue to grow this ambitious new program.”

Prior to arriving at BWH, Dr. Jennings directed the McGovern Institute Neurotechnology Program at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), which supports collaborative projects across all areas of neuroscience, and was the first executive director of the Harvard Stem Cell Institute. His research endeavors are well-documented in various publications. He also was the founding chief editor of Nature Neuroscience and executive editor of the Nature monthly research journals. Dr. Jennings is a lecturer on neurology at Harvard Medical School.

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